Reflections of William Connors, American Expat and Translator Living in Germany

Translator and Explorer, Bill Connors, has lived a hell of a life. In this personal essay, he reflects on what travel means to him, the trials that he's undergone and insights had, while living a life of adventure. His work can be found at siftingthroughlifeandtheworld.com Bill’s shirt translates, “foreign devil” It would be nice to … Continue reading Reflections of William Connors, American Expat and Translator Living in Germany

The Rise of The People’s Republic of China

From Lijiang, Yunnan Province It is not possible to discuss global economics or world affairs without including The People's Republic of China. Home to approximately 1.436 billion people, China is a nation to be reckoned with by population alone. It is astounding that even if one billion of its inhabitants were to somehow leave or … Continue reading The Rise of The People’s Republic of China

Brexit, An American’s Perspective

"Yea...Brexit. Sorry about that..." Lara said to me quickly, quietly and in a tone ripe with annoyance. We were walking through the Scottish National Gallery in Edinburgh, discussing art, history and traveling, when the very sensitive topic that is all the noise surrounding her home country, was brought to light and was then subsequently dropped, … Continue reading Brexit, An American’s Perspective

A Real Inconvenient Truth; The U.S. Secret War in Laos

(Taken near Vang Vieng) When most people think of Laos, they imagine thick green jungles and epic Karst mountains splaying across an ancient spiritual and culturally unique landscape. Some may think of The Hmong, their especially distinct customs and shamanic practices. Travelers might recall the numerous Theravada Buddhist temples scattered in every part of the … Continue reading A Real Inconvenient Truth; The U.S. Secret War in Laos

Michael Crichton’s “Travels”

It is hard for one to fully grasp the story telling capabilities and high level of intellect that the late Michael Crichton possessed. Most well known for his best selling novels Jurassic Park, Rising Sun and The Andromeda Strain, Crichton was also a Harvard trained medical doctor and amateur anthropologist. He brought all of these … Continue reading Michael Crichton’s “Travels”

Galway, A Gem of The North Atlantic

Galway has long been considered the cultural capital of Ireland. Festive and artsy, with many unique and elaborately painted pubs, the city may be the best place to enjoy good food, a few pints and a good craic. Located on the west coast of the island, and serving as the half way mark on The … Continue reading Galway, A Gem of The North Atlantic

The Anomaly Of Fairfield, Iowa

  I can remember it like it was yesterday. June 6, 2013. The day I learned Transcendental meditation. I had been desiring to learn the esoteric technique ever since reading about the practice in a college credit, sociology course in High School. Brought to the West by Indian guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a movement was … Continue reading The Anomaly Of Fairfield, Iowa

Russiaphobia; Not Good for America, Disastrous for The World

      It seems its near impossible in our current period, to turn on the news or surf the internet without coming across a news piece that regards Russia in a negative light. Not only are they apparently responsible for the election of Donald Trump, they are aggressively challenging the US and its allies … Continue reading Russiaphobia; Not Good for America, Disastrous for The World

Human Origins; Neanderthals and Language

Were Homo sapiens the first Hominids to have the ability to communicate with complex speech? It’s an elaborate and difficult question to answer. The relevance of whether or not Humans were the first to communicate with complex speech is however, a monumental question in our evolutionary history because language is something that separates us from … Continue reading Human Origins; Neanderthals and Language